1. I’ve been distracted with pinterest!

    Pinterest has been taking over my blogging life… so follow me there if you are interested in what I’m staring at… my pinterest! I promise to come back to my tumblr life ASAP! I’m trying to build a blog on blogger… so I’ll repost it there and try to link it together! Been cooking up some goodies (meaning art and accessories) I’m working to be more organized about it! Like cleaning up my art space and my plan for creating. Thanks for the support! :D

  2. refashioner:

It’s easy to convince somebody that a hamburger and fries produced out of a giant fast-food corporation assembly line is bad for you. That fifteen dollar, Forever21 mass-produced tee you bought for a last-minute date? Just as detrimental.
Okay, perhaps you won’t be adding inches to your waistline or clogging your arteries, but your wallet will suffer for repeat fast-clothing purchases.  And that only is the tip of the iceberg to the severe waste and environmental damage the fashion industry is responsible for.
Thanks to the pervasive power of the internet, the sustainable fashion trend is growing stronger all over the world. And hopefully, with these five new game-changers to the industry, the trend will pass into a transformation of the fashion industry.
1. Transparency.

Knowing exactly where your clothes come from, where the materials are sourced, the source of labor, and the manner in which they are produced is a big step towards sustainability and accountability.  Look to the recently launched site Honestby, where all sourced materials are extensively researched and all elements are environmentally friendly as possible.  Sort by designer, as well as organic, vegan, skin-friendly, recycled, and European.
2. Designers with a Sustainable state of mind

A few established designers have tipped a hat at the sustainable trend (like Costello Tagliapietra and Zero + Maria Cornejo), but it’s inspiring to see up and coming independent designers who design with an entirely eco-state of mind.  Eva Zingoni had her start in the fashion industry as a middle-man between buyers and designers, and saw the manufacturing process — and the vast waste that goes along with it, up close. Her creations are highly coveted, and she puts an emphasis on the local aspect, as well.  We look forward to seeing all the young, new designers to fully embrace the responsibility of being sustainable.
3. Coalitions and Collaborations

There are dozens of tiny forces, banding together, all in the name of sustainable fashion. Once the companies that specifically endorse or foster sustainable fashion grow and merge, these ethics will become industry standards.  Source for Style (where one can find local and sustainable materials), founded by eco-model Summer Rayne Oakes is pairing with The IOU Project (which connects consumers to local artisans) to find a new designer for IOU’s capsule collection.  We’re crossing our fingers that this designer takes over next year’s fashion week - beyond the Green Shows.
4. Model Alliance

The newly created Model Alliance is a huge breakthrough for working models. While their focus may be on enforcing child labor laws, fair and safe work environments, and preventing sexual harassment, they form a powerful group.  If every model banded together and refused to work for companies that practice unfair labor laws, enable unsafe work places, and exploit the environment in the name of profit, a lot of change could be made.
5.  Upcycling, and the New Consumer
And of course, ‘upcycling’ as an umbrella concept, embracing, of course, recycling old materials into new. Vintage stores like The Reformation in LA put a sustainable and exciting spin on the thrift shopping market. But we think that upcycling can be a more general term, and non-exclusive to designers or those good with a needle a thread. Throw a high-fashion swap (or here on ReFashioner ;) or simply quality clothing that already exists. The last and most important game-changer, of course, is you - the consumer. The choices we make collectively wield power over the biggest industry movers and shakers.  You’ve already likely given up McDonalds. Swapping a Marni for a Margiela?  Now you’re already upcycling. And paving the way for a more sustainably fashionable world.

    refashioner:

    It’s easy to convince somebody that a hamburger and fries produced out of a giant fast-food corporation assembly line is bad for you. That fifteen dollar, Forever21 mass-produced tee you bought for a last-minute date? Just as detrimental.

    Okay, perhaps you won’t be adding inches to your waistline or clogging your arteries, but your wallet will suffer for repeat fast-clothing purchases.  And that only is the tip of the iceberg to the severe waste and environmental damage the fashion industry is responsible for.

    Thanks to the pervasive power of the internet, the sustainable fashion trend is growing stronger all over the world. And hopefully, with these five new game-changers to the industry, the trend will pass into a transformation of the fashion industry.

    1. Transparency.

    Knowing exactly where your clothes come from, where the materials are sourced, the source of labor, and the manner in which they are produced is a big step towards sustainability and accountability.  Look to the recently launched site Honestby, where all sourced materials are extensively researched and all elements are environmentally friendly as possible.  Sort by designer, as well as organic, vegan, skin-friendly, recycled, and European.

    2. Designers with a Sustainable state of mind

    A few established designers have tipped a hat at the sustainable trend (like Costello Tagliapietra and Zero + Maria Cornejo), but it’s inspiring to see up and coming independent designers who design with an entirely eco-state of mind.  Eva Zingoni had her start in the fashion industry as a middle-man between buyers and designers, and saw the manufacturing process — and the vast waste that goes along with it, up close. Her creations are highly coveted, and she puts an emphasis on the local aspect, as well.  We look forward to seeing all the young, new designers to fully embrace the responsibility of being sustainable.

    3. Coalitions and Collaborations

    There are dozens of tiny forces, banding together, all in the name of sustainable fashion. Once the companies that specifically endorse or foster sustainable fashion grow and merge, these ethics will become industry standards.  Source for Style (where one can find local and sustainable materials), founded by eco-model Summer Rayne Oakes is pairing with The IOU Project (which connects consumers to local artisans) to find a new designer for IOU’s capsule collection.  We’re crossing our fingers that this designer takes over next year’s fashion week - beyond the Green Shows.

    4. Model Alliance

    The newly created Model Alliance is a huge breakthrough for working models. While their focus may be on enforcing child labor laws, fair and safe work environments, and preventing sexual harassment, they form a powerful group.  If every model banded together and refused to work for companies that practice unfair labor laws, enable unsafe work places, and exploit the environment in the name of profit, a lot of change could be made.

    5.  Upcycling, and the New Consumer

    And of course, ‘upcycling’ as an umbrella concept, embracing, of course, recycling old materials into new. Vintage stores like The Reformation in LA put a sustainable and exciting spin on the thrift shopping market. But we think that upcycling can be a more general term, and non-exclusive to designers or those good with a needle a thread. Throw a high-fashion swap (or here on ReFashioner ;) or simply quality clothing that already exists.
    The last and most important game-changer, of course, is you - the consumer. The choices we make collectively wield power over the biggest industry movers and shakers.  You’ve already likely given up McDonalds. Swapping a Marni for a Margiela?  Now you’re already upcycling. And paving the way for a more sustainably fashionable world.

  3. Ukay Ukay Moda will now become a store (but will continue to be a blog)

    Thank you to whoever has been following me on here. I’ve decided to take Ukay Ukay Moda as a name and make it into a store to put out my art, jewelry, and apparel. You can visit me here at Ukay Ukay Moda, check it out! BUT I will continue to blog about the fashion culture we live in with a critical eye as well as promoting my work with maintaining my ideals and standing in alignment with what I’ve been sharing on this blog.

    Art and Fashion culture needs to be examined, criticized, and celebrated. When fashion finally begins to take on a form to change for the better of the people, the world, to become “eco-conscious”, as well conscious about how we affect the world. We must begin to think about the fairness to those who labor for our fashion needs, then can we begin to build a consciousness about what fashion really MEANS. It needs to be taken back by those who create what is given to the world, and THAT is the womyn, men, and children’s who have laboriously created what we wear on our backs, to the cultures who have been tokenized and reduced to be seen as “native” patterns, to those exploited by an industry created to oppress the very people who’s blood in sewn into our clothes. I am driven by these notions, and I hope to continue exploring these issues on this blog as well as within my artwork.

    Thank you and I hope to share more, sharing my work and thoughts is a healing process and is done with a lot of thought, so thank you for your support in following me! :D

  4. carrymetoo:

#appropriation #realize #fighting #against #headdress #girl #nativeamerican

    carrymetoo:

    #appropriation #realize #fighting #against #headdress #girl #nativeamerican

About me

Ukay Ukay Moda started as a tumblr to explore the concept of fashion culture and how it has an affect on the environment through the eyes of a woman of color... It soon became the name of my store! I will continue blogging about these issues as well as putting up my work that will be on sale. Thank you for supporting a sister! I love taking nothing and making it into something... "ukay ukay" literally translates in Tagalog "digging" and is in reference to a store or street vendor in the Philippines where you can buy used clothes and other used items, much like thrift stores, and flea markets. "moda" means fashion or style. *check out my home tumblr: Diasporic Hues Follow me on twitter!